Tell A Tale in 500 Words

RUNNER By BOBBIE PRIME

She pounded along the pavement through the darkness and pouring rain, splashing through puddles, clinking on pebbles.“Woman beats car!” she thought to herself with satisfaction, speeding past the crawling traffic. She turned into her gate and walked awkwardly up the drive and went into the house to shower and change.

After story time when when the kids were tucked up in bed, and she and Bob had eaten dinner she went and sat in the study for a while. The shelves were lined with framed photos of her standing on a podium proudly wearing an Olympic gold medal, passing the finishing post at the London Marathon, shaking hands with the Queen at Buckingham Palace.

She sat lost in thought….Who would have predicted that she would reach this level of achievement? Who would have thought it possible? Her mind slipped back to when she was six,..”The age that Jamie is now,” she thought with a shudder.

She remembered lying in the hospital bed, her body feeling strange and different, her parents clinging to her hands, her mother's face anxious and wrought. It was several days before she learned that both her lower legs had been amputated to save her from the meningitis that was invading her body.

After endless months in hospital, visits to clinics and physiotherapists, she eventually went back to school wearing artificial legs. The children were fascinated and curious but soon forgot that she was different. When the school had swimming lessons there was great debate with her parents and teachers as to what to do about her during the lessons. “Let her have a go,” said her dad, so she did!



Once the other kids had got over their horror of seeing her lowered into the pool without her legs, she found something wonderful about the element of water; her arms flailed like a windmill, her stumps thrashed up and down and soon she was swimming, ploughing through the water and before long passing most of the other kids. Swimming became a passion; she joined a sports organisation which was specially for people like her where she discovered the joy of competing against others like her, with no one to stare or pity at her loss.



One day she was watching television and saw someone like her running! Running swiftly on strange metal blade-like legs, running straight and true. Eventually, after much pestering she had got her own blades and felt a great surge of power and achievement. She began running obsessively, overcoming the pain and soreness; at first short races and then marathons, race after race culminating in triumph at an international marathon and the ultimate joy, winning a 200 meter sprint at the Olympics.

Now her name was known around the world, her successes celebrated and she spent much of her time working with charities to encourage and inspire children who, like herself, had started out life with seemingly ovewhelming handicaps. She taught them that nothing is impossible if you try hard enough.





She pounded along the pavement through the darkness and pouring rain, splashing through puddles, clinking on pebbles.“Woman beats car!” she thought to herself with satisfaction, speeding past the crawling traffic. She turned into her gate and walked awkwardly up the drive and went into the house to shower and change.

After story time when when the kids were tucked up in bed, and she and Bob had eaten dinner she went and sat in the study for a while. The shelves were lined with framed photos of her standing on a podium proudly wearing an Olympic gold medal, passing the finishing post at the London Marathon, shaking hands with the Queen at Buckingham Palace.

She sat lost in thought….Who would have predicted that she would reach this level of achievement? Who would have thought it possible? Her mind slipped back to when she was six,..”The age that Jamie is now,” she thought with a shudder.

She remembered lying in the hospital bed, her body feeling strange and different, her parents clinging to her hands, her mother's face anxious and wrought. It was several days before she learned that both her lower legs had been amputated to save her from the meningitis that was invading her body.

After endless months in hospital, visits to clinics and physiotherapists, she eventually went back to school wearing artificial legs. The children were fascinated and curious but soon forgot that she was different. When the school had swimming lessons there was great debate with her parents and teachers as to what to do about her during the lessons. “Let her have a go,” said her dad, so she did!



Once the other kids had got over their horror of seeing her lowered into the pool without her legs, she found something wonderful about the element of water; her arms flailed like a windmill, her stumps thrashed up and down and soon she was swimming, ploughing through the water and before long passing most of the other kids. Swimming became a passion; she joined a sports organisation which was specially for people like her where she discovered the joy of competing against others like her, with no one to stare or pity at her loss.



One day she was watching television and saw someone like her running! Running swiftly on strange metal blade-like legs, running straight and true. Eventually, after much pestering she had got her own blades and felt a great surge of power and achievement. She began running obsessively, overcoming the pain and soreness; at first short races and then marathons, race after race culminating in triumph at an international marathon and the ultimate joy, winning a 200 meter sprint at the Olympics.

Now her name was known around the world, her successes celebrated and she spent much of her time working with charities to encourage and inspire children who, like herself, had started out life with seemingly ovewhelming handicaps. She taught them that nothing is impossible if you try hard enough.







 


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