Creative Comedy Project

Keeping Kes By debbie Moss

Keeping Kes *

EXT. THE YORKSHIRE SCULPTURE PARK,

Kulvinder, is walking around one of the statues being steadied by her daughter, Pritpal (aged 15) who is keenly observing the sculptures in the park as well as trying to guide her mother. Kulvinder's husband , Surinder, is following behind carrying two bags filled with tupperware lunch boxes. Kulvinder looks with distaste at the bronze statue and the wondering sheep. They are meeting up with her son, Bal (aged 19), his (very close) close friend Jaz (19) and Jaz's mum, Asha, at the park to celebrate Bal's 20th Birthday.

Kulvinder

I just don’t understand why your brother wants to spend his birthday with sheep?

Pritpal

He wants to spend it with art mum. Look around you.

Kulvinder

Did you know what your brother was going to do?

Pritpal

About what?

Pritpal continues to stare at the large bulbous sculpture Of Ryder’s Mad March Hare some distance in front in front of her.

Kulvinder

You know what. Did you know he was going cut his hair?



Pritpal

My only surprise mum is that he hasn’t done it sooner.

Kulvinder

I’m surprised at Jaz .What was he thinking cutting off your brother's hair? I’m sure his mum would be disappointed. Asha knows how important keeping Kes is to this family. Just wait til she gets here. Let me have that map.



Surinder

So you can get us lost. We’re supposed to be meeting them at the Hare



Kulvinder fumbles with the map guide to the sculptures, then throws it to Pritpal who knows the level of detail provided would be wasted on her mother. Kulvinder spots the large ten foot sculpture of the woman with the head, of a rabbit.



Kulvinder

It’s over there. I can see it. What on earth would anyone want to make a woman into a monster rabbit?

Pritpal

It’s not a rabbit, it’s the head of a hare, and most of the work is in the shape of a woman’s body. It’s you mum, a Mad March Hare!



Pritpal and her father both laugh.

Pritpal

Come on mum. You must have been surprised that he’s kept Kes for so long. You can’t blame Jaz, It’s Bal’s hair and if that’s what his best friend wants. Please promise you won’t have a go at Asha.



Surinder

Don’t mention it to Jaz or Bal either You know that Bal has been planning this day for Jaz for ages and wants to make his birthday special. Best just leave it, at least for today.





Pritpal

Best friends, what sort of friend….

Kulvinder

Come with me mum. I’ll tell you why the sculptor thinks you’re a mad hare. Just while we’re waiting for Bal and the others anyway.

Pritpal

Are you going to let you daughter speak to me like this?



Kulvinder looks to Surinder for support. But none is forthcoming.



Surinder

Go on Kulvinder, I’ll sit here with the boxes, I’ll fend off members of the public who want to steel your curries, after their disappointment with the tasteless food on offer in the cafĂ©!



Pritpal and Surinder laugh much to the annoyance of Kulvinder.

Kulvinder

Wait til you want to eat!

Pritpal

Come on mum, let’s go and see the rabbit.



Pritpal takes her mother tenderly by the arm and guides her to where she could see the face of the Hare and gaze in full at the distinctive curves of a young woman’s body sitting on bended knees.



Kulvinder

Why, why didn’t he tell me? Long pause Why is the rabbit split in two?



Pritpal hadn’t noticed until that point, the large crack splitting the sculpture in two, front and back.



Kulvinder

My mother misses nothing.

Kulvinder reads from the guide to the Park

Pritpal

It says here the sculptor wants you to be able to walk inside many of her works, they can be entered and walked through.

Kulvinder

Only if you’re a stick. What sort of woman could walk through that, not a real one.

Pritpal

It’s symbolic mum. I told you, the woman’s you, your fertlilty, family, home.

Kulvinder

Yes, yes, I know, I give birth to you, give you a home and then you’re gone! Well I hope he knows with or without his hair he will need me his whole life!

Pritpal

Look there’s Bal, Asha and Jaz, come on mum!







*Kes is Sikh practice allowing one's hair to grow naturally as a symbol of respect for the perfection of God's creation and is one of the five K’s, of Sikhism (Kesh).



 


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